Tony Cimorosi

Bassistes, musiciens, luthiers ......
Répondre
Avatar du membre
Bruno Chaza
Maestro
Maestro
Messages : 2037
Enregistré le : 07 sept. 2004, 21:51
Localisation : France
Contact :

Tony Cimorosi

Message par Bruno Chaza » 15 nov. 2005, 14:12

Hello Tony, what were the critical aspects of your musical development (other musicians, specific books, getting to know a standard, a personal revelation, a certain practice method, etc.)?
Hello Bruno, well, I won't go back to when I was 6 years old when I started to play around on the piano. I grew up in Wilmington, Delaware outside of Philadelphia. When I was about 18 a jazz saxophonist named Joe Harris recommended me to study with this older gentleman named Bosie. Little did I know that Bosie (Robert Lowery) taught such great musicians from my area like Clifford Brown and Ernie Watts etc...? I studied with Bosie for only a short time but, I got lots out of it. He introduced a method to playing for over chord changes and learning more about harmony and improvisation. A couple of years later I moved to Boston Massachusetts and started playing with musicians from Berklee School of Music. I got a gig with a group and we started writing and playing our own music that at that time resembled groups like Yes, King Crimson, gentle Giant and ELP. The music was very changeling and the musicians were well schooled and primed for achieving great things. You know the story. Bands like that didn’t make too much money and eventually dispersed. They inspired me to start studying acoustic bass with Berklee faculty bassist, john Neves. While studying at Berklee and doing local gigs I saw Stanley Clarke playing with Chick Corea and Return to Forever. Well, I was floored by the band and Stanley’s playing so I contacted him and drove from Boston to NYC to take bass lessons with the maestro. After being on the road for a while, I decided to ventured back to Boston and that’s when I began my studies with Charles Banacus. Charlie changed my musical life. He's the Boston guru of jazz improvisation education. His studies were rigorous and demanded hours of writing and playing. The techniques that were covered included; chord scale improvisation, repertoire, pentatonic improvisation using his book and ear training via transcriptions. Here's my first lesson.

Learn all major scales in 15 keys (yes) 15 keys from the lowest note on the bass to the highest. On one string using one finger and doing the same with arpeggios. All written and played... transcribe Herbie's solo from (there's no greater love) off of the four or more record. That all took about 70 hours of work. When I went in the following week for my second lesson, Charlie was inquiring as to why I couldn't play the solo on bass at tempo. My musical Epiphany

When I lived in Boston I was fortunate to have great musicians around me as room mates and band mates. Drummer Casey Scheurell was one of those. One day I was practicing Joy Spring on the upright and he came into the room with the Jaco record and put on Donna Lee. Man, after that me, like a million other fender bass players pulled those nasty frets out of the bass finding that we had to fix it back again in order to keep our gigs. After a while when you'd get comfortable without the frets. That was the time when lots of us were trying to sound likes jaco and not who we really were. I call that period, “the identity crisis of my bass self”. I got over it and moved on... then Marcus miller came on the scene and WOW!
Playing with drummers like Casey, Vinnie Caluttia, Steve Smith (journey)These musicians taught me valuable lessons on playing time. Learning the inside scoop about music and trusting your counterpart (the drummer) was paramount when it came to drums and bass. There were also some great bass players like Neil Stubenhause, Tim Landers, Rich Appleman and John Neves on the scene to inspire me. Recordings like Emerald Tears (Dave Holland) and Mountains in the clouds (mirslov Vitous) were always on my turntable. Guitarist Ross Adams was very influential on many levels musically and spiritually.

Ø If I want to go out and buy a CD or a method of yours tomorrow, what do you recommend I listen to?
My new Cd, it's been one hell of a journey to finish but I think I’m there. The studio lost 4 songs in pro-tools so I had to re-record some new tracks. I'm very proud of this piece and I think it represents my eclectic musical nature. I think my solo on Dear Prudence from the Eklipse cd is a good representation of my 6 string bass playing. The solo on Blue Samba from my debut cd titled Tony Cimorosi NY International gives the listener a chance to hear my writing and soloing skills with Brazilian fusion. I just finished recording a Cd with a 20 piece big band playing my NS electric upright bass and man, that's a good one too. You See, I can't make a choice.

Ø Are there still musicians that you listen to who give you strength and energy? Could you talk about that?
the musicians that I play with inspire me as a composer and player. These musicians include Andrew Scott Potter, Alex Foster, Jay Azzolina, Rob Aries, Frank Colon, Steve Johns, Badal Roy, Vince Cherico and the list goes on and on.

Ø Could you describe a typical week in your life (your interactions with other musicians, your courses, rehearsals, > practice)?
I exercise in the morning, joggle 3 balls, practice Chi Kung and eat my oatmeal. LOL
Musically, I practice Bach. The cello suites both pizz and arco, then i'll play along with CDs like Kurt Elling or a Wayne Shorter records like “Speak no evil”. There’s always a lesson waiting when you play with Wayne. I think playing with singers is a great challenge and listening to their phrasing helps me to sing better on my instrument. With Wayne Shorter, it's composition, ear-training, improvisation and responding.

Ø What is your preferred ensemble – the trio or the quartet? Do you think a certain ensemble works best or does it depend on your > mood?
I think the trio is the most personable for me. The piano (keyboards), bass and drums.... and let's not forget the cost of paying more players do your gigs (he he).... When I start to tour with this new cd (Horizon) I'll most likely use a trio and when possible, add a horn.

Ø Along the same line, do you have a favorite tempo? What keys do you like to play in?
I like most tempo's ... and I can pretty much play comfortably in the up-tempo be-bop, Brazilian, Afro-Cuban and Fusion styles. I love playing ballads and in 6/8 off the cuff, I’d say 126 is fun and 138 playing 1/16 note range is exciting.

Ø Do you consider the bass as a rhythm instrument or do you also find appeal in freeform soloing and chord-playing?
It's both, and today because of technology, and musicians like Stanley Clarke, Dave Holland, Jaco, John Patitucci and Mirslov, we can get see what it's like to be up front of the band as soloist and rhythm section players. The bass is wide open and still available to cover ground in uncharted seas of notes and rhythms. Composers like jaco and Scott lafaro helped propelled the bass up a notch and earlier guys like Mingus, Chambers and Pettiford moved the bass into the upper register. We have to keep writing for the instrument and trying new things.

Ø Where do you think Coltrane’s experiment with two basses in one band could lead music?
I think trane was always experimenting with new and unusual concepts with musk, composition, and spiritual connections. With the two bass concepts, I think it's more of an orchestration concept of the lower register.

Ø What advice would you give to young musicians reading this?
Follow what you love to do and stay with it as long as you live. Eat well, exercise, meditate, don’t forget to help other musicians and play as much as possible.

Ø Do you think there are any solutions to the crisis in the recording industry, the struggle of those who try to make a living as musicians, and the digitalization of music?

Not really, I think this time is a good time for independent musicians. We now have the internet to distribute our product and the technology to record at affordable levels.

Ø Without getting into a deeply philosophical debate, do you think musicians have something to say about the world’s troubles: global warming, conflicts, economic struggles?
Something to say. Well, anyone and everyone musician or not has a point of view about this subject. If you read history you can see that things really haven’t changed with us except that we now have technology and the capability of total destruction. Musicians speak about the times their in and these times are precarious times for the world and art.

Bruno, thanks for giving me the opportunity to speak to your reader’s. I have seen from your web site and your books that you’re one of those talented and gifted artists making the message clear to others with your music and writing. Your way of imparting knowledge and wisdom to others is admirable. I look forward to the day we meet and play. BIG HUG! TOnyc

http://www.tonycimorosi.com

madogs
Chef d'orchestre
Chef d'orchestre
Messages : 622
Enregistré le : 27 avr. 2005, 11:30
Localisation : Marmotland
Contact :

Message par madogs » 15 nov. 2005, 15:04

très volontiers !
"le talent c'est d'avoir envie de faire quelque chose, tout le restant, c'est de la sueur." Brel

Avatar du membre
Bruno Chaza
Maestro
Maestro
Messages : 2037
Enregistré le : 07 sept. 2004, 21:51
Localisation : France
Contact :

En ligne

Message par Bruno Chaza » 21 nov. 2005, 21:10

Allez l'anglais et le français tout est en ligne a disposition pour cet entretien avec le bassiste New Yorkais Tony Cimorosi, comme d'habitude vos commentaires font vivre les rubriques alors à vos claviers !!! :wink:
Modifié en dernier par Bruno Chaza le 19 juil. 2007, 11:31, modifié 1 fois.

madogs
Chef d'orchestre
Chef d'orchestre
Messages : 622
Enregistré le : 27 avr. 2005, 11:30
Localisation : Marmotland
Contact :

Message par madogs » 22 nov. 2005, 07:45

kawabounga hi ha !!!

merci
"le talent c'est d'avoir envie de faire quelque chose, tout le restant, c'est de la sueur." Brel

fanto
Chef d'orchestre
Chef d'orchestre
Messages : 701
Enregistré le : 14 mars 2005, 15:16
Localisation : Isère/Savoie

Message par fanto » 22 nov. 2005, 09:44

madogs a écrit :kawabounga hi ha !!!

merci
J'aurais pas dis mieux !!! :lol:
La meilleure spontanéité est celle qui est mûrement réfléchie...

Avatar du membre
Thomas
Moderato
Messages : 1111
Enregistré le : 05 nov. 2004, 14:00
Localisation : Cahors

Message par Thomas » 05 déc. 2005, 18:05

Super intéressant ce mec ! Merci pour l'interview... :wink:

Avatar du membre
Bruno Chaza
Maestro
Maestro
Messages : 2037
Enregistré le : 07 sept. 2004, 21:51
Localisation : France
Contact :

Re: Tony Cimorosi

Message par Bruno Chaza » 12 janv. 2018, 17:46

Je mets en ligne la traduction de l'interview réalisée avec Tony Cimorosi.

Ø Quelles ont été les clés de ton évolution, ce qui t’a réellement permis d’avancer, les musiciens, un livre d’étude particulier, la compréhension d’un standard, un déclic personnel, une façon particulière de travailler etc… ?

Bien, je ne remonterai pas à l’âge de 6 ans quand j’ai commencé à jouer un peu du piano. J’ai grandi à Willmington dans le Delaware, à l’extérieur de Philadelphie. Vers 18 ans, un saxophoniste de jazz nommé Joe Harris m’a recommandé d’étudier avec ce monsieur d’un certain âge nommé Bosie. Je savais à peine que Bosie (Robert Lowery) avait enseigné à de grands musiciens de ma région comme Clifford Brown et Ernie Watts, etc. Je n’ai étudié que peu de temps avec Bosie, mais j’en ai retiré beaucoup : il a créé une méthode de jeu sur des changements d’accords et d’apprentissage plus basée sur l’harmonie et l’improvisation. Quelques années plus tard, j’ai déménagé à Boston, Massachussetts et ai commencé à jouer avec des musiciens de l’Ecole de Berklee. J’ai été engagé dans un groupe et nous avons commencé à écrire et jouer notre propre musique qui à cette époque ressemblait à celle de groupes comme Yes, King Crimson, gentle Giant et ELP. La musique était très planante et les musiciens étaient bien éduqués et recevaient des récompenses parce qu’ils accomplissaient de grandes choses. Tu connais l’histoire. Des groupes comme ça ne gagnaient pas bien leur vie et finissaient par se disperser. Ils m’ont donné envie de commencer à étudier la basse acoustique avec le bassiste de la faculté de Berklee : John Neves. Pendant que j’étudiais à Berklee et avais des engagements locaux j’ai vu Stanley Clarke jouer avec Chick Corea et Return to Forever. Bon, j’ai été sonné par le groupe et le jeu de Stanley alors je l’ai contacté et ai conduit de Boston à NYC pour prendre des leçons de basse avec le maestro. Après avoir fait la route pendant un moment, j’ai décidé de m’aventurer de nouveau à Boston et c’est là que j’ai commencé mes études avec Charles Banacus. Charlie a changé ma vie musicale. Il est le Gourou de Boston de l’éducation de l’improvisation en Jazz. Ses études étaient rigoureuses et demandaient des heures d’écriture et de pratique. Les techniques couvertes comprenaient : improvisation d’accord de gamme, répertoire, improvisation pentatonique en utilisant son livre et en entraînant l’oreille par des transcriptions. Voici ma première leçon :

Apprendre toutes les gammes majeures en 15 clés (oui) 15 clés depuis la note la plus basse de la basse jusqu’à la plus haute. Sur une corde en utilisant un doigt et faire la même chose avec les arpèges. Tout écrit et joué … transcrire le solo d’Herbie de (there's no greater love) depuis quatre enregistrements ou plus. Tout ceci prit environ 70 heures de travail. Quand j’arrivais la semaine suivante pour mon second cours, Charlie demandait pourquoi je ne pouvais pas jouer le solo sur la basse au temps. Mon épiphanie musicale.

Quand j’ai vécu à Boston, j’ai eu la chance d’avoir de grands musiciens autour de moi comme colocataires et compagnons de groupe musical. Le batteur Casey Scheurell en faisait partie. Un jour je pratiquais Joy Spring sur l’upright et il entra dans la pièce avec le disque de Jaco et mit Donna Lee. Ah la la, mon vieux, après ça, comme un million d’autres joueurs de basse fender j’ai sorti ces méchantes frettes de la basse, découvrant que nous aurions à les remettre pour respecter nos engagements. Après un moment quand on s’est senti à l’aise sans les frettes, ce fut l’époque où beaucoup d’entre nous ont essayé d’avoir le même son que Jaco et non pas le sien propre. Je nomme cette période “la crise d’identité de mon moi bassiste”. Je l’ai dépassé et ai continué à avancer … alors, Marcus Miller est arrivé sur la scène et WOW !

J’ai joué avec des batteurs comme Casey, Vinnie Caluttia, Steve Smith (tournée). Ces musiciens m’ont enseigné des leçons importantes tout en jouant. Apprendre les dernières infos sur la musique et vous fier à votre partenaire (le batteur) était primordial quand il s’agissait de batteries et de basses. Il y avait aussi de grands joueurs de basse comme Neil Stubenhause, Tim Landers, Rich Appleman et John Neves sur la scène pour m’inspirer. Des enregistrements comme Emerald Tears (Dave Holland) et Mountains in the clouds (Mirslov Vitous) étaient toujours sur ma platine. Le guitariste Ross Adams avait beaucoup d’influence à de nombreux niveaux, musicalement et spirituellement.

Ø sur quel album aimerais-tu que l’on t’écoute, demain je veux acheter un CD où tu joues, qu’est-ce que tu nous conseilles ?
Mon nouveau CD. Ça a été un travail d’enfer pour le finir, mais je pense que j’y suis. Le studio a perdu 4 chansons dans les outils pro et j’ai dû réenregistrer quelques nouvelles pistes. Je suis très fier de cette œuvre et je pense qu’il représente ma nature musicale éclectique. Je pense que mon solo sur Dear Prudence dans le CD Eklipse représente bien ma façon de jouer de la basse à 6 cordes. Le solo sur Blue Samba de mon premier CD intitulé Tony Cimorosi NY International donne à l’auditeur une possibilité d’entendre mes capacités d’écriture et de jeu solo en fusion brésilienne. Je viens juste d’enregistrer un CD avec un orchestre (big band) de 20 instruments en jouant de ma basse upright électrique NS et ma foi, c’est un bon aussi. Tu vois, je n’arrive pas à choisir.

Ø Est-ce que tu écoutes encore maintenant des musiciens qui te donnent de l’énergie et de la force, peux-tu nous en parler ?
Les musiciens avec lesquels je joue m’inspirent en tant que compositeur et en tant qu’instrumentiste. Ces musiciens comprennent Andrew Scott Potter, Frank Colon, Steve Johns, Badal Roy, Vince Cherico et la liste s’allonge, s’allonge …

Ø Peux-tu nous décrire une semaine type de ta vie de musicien, cours, séances répétitions, travail personnel ?
Je m’exerce le matin à jongler avec 3 balles, pratique le Chi-Qong et mange mes céréales. LOL.

Musicalement, je pratique Bach
. Les suites au violoncelle à la fois en pizz et arco, puis je joue en accompagnant des CDs comme ceux de Kurt Elling ou les enregistrements d’un Wayne Shorter comme “Speak no evil”. Il y a aussi une leçon à apprendre en jouant avec Wayne. Je pense que jouer avec des chanteurs est un sacré challenge et écouter leur phrasé m’aide à mieux chanter sur mon instrument. Avec Wayne Shorter, c’est de la composition, un entraînement pour l’oreille, de l’improvisation et la question réponse.

Ø Quelles sont les affinités propres à ton jeu, trio, quartet, y a t’il selon toi une formule qui fait passer le mieux ce que tu as à dire ou est-ce suivant l’humeur ?
Je pense que pour moi le plus beau est le trio. Le piano (claviers), la basse et la batterie… et n’oublie pas le coût de payer plus de musiciens pour tes spectacles (hé, hé) …Quand je commencerai la tournée avec ce nouveau disque (Horizon), j’utiliserai très probablement un trio et si possible j’ajouterai un cuivre.

Ø Dans le même style de question as-tu un tempo, ton tempo, lequel ? Qu’elles sont les tonalités que tu apprécies et dans lesquelles tu navigues en liberté ?
j’aime la plupart des tempos …et je me sens plutôt confortable quand je joue en up-tempo be-bop, les styles brésilien, Afro-Cubain et fusion. J’aime jouer les ballades en 6/8 de manière impromptue, je dirais que 126 est fun et jouer à 138 des enchaînements de doubles-croches est excitant.

Ø Considères-tu la basse comme l’instrument du groove, ou es-tu de ceux qui aiment aussi la liberté en solo et en accords ?
C’est les deux à la fois, et aujourd’hui grâce à la technologie et aux musiciens comme Stanley Clarke, Dave Holland, Jaco, John Patitucci et Mirslov, on peut voir ce que c’est d’être à l’avant du groupe en tant que soliste et musiciens de la section rythmes. La basse est largement ouverte et également disponible pour couvrir le sol d’océans inexplorés de notes et de rythmes. Des compositeurs comme Jaco et Scott Lafaro ont aidé à propulser la basse un cran plus haut et, plus tôt, des mecs comme Mingus, Chambers et Pettiford ont placé la basse dans le registre supérieur. Nous devons continuer à écrire pour l’instrument et essayer des choses nouvelles.

Ø Deux basses dans un orchestre comme Coltrane l’a expérimenté, tu penses que ça peut orienter la musique vers quelle direction ?
Je pense que ‘trane était constamment en train de tester des concepts nouveaux et inhabituels avec du musc, de la composition et des connexions spirituelles. Avec les concepts à deux basses, je pense qu’il s’agit plus d’un concept d’orchestration au registre plus grave.

Ø Quels sont les conseils que tu donnerais aux aspirants musiciens qui te lisent ?
Suis ce que tu aimes faire et tiens-toi y toute ta vie. Mange bien, fais de l’exercice, médite, n’oublie pas d’aider les autres musiciens et joue autant que possible.

Ø La crise du disque, l’individualisme forcené de ceux qui arrivent à vivre de la musique, le formatage des musiques, est-ce que tu penses que la pente est irréversible ou est-ce que tu entrevois des solutions ?
Pas vraiment, je crois que cette époque est bonne pour les musiciens indépendants. Nous avons maintenant internet pour distribuer notre production et la technologie pour faire des enregistrements à des niveaux abordables.

Ø Sans rentrer dans un haut débat philosophique, penses-tu que le musicien à son mot à dire face aux cris d’alarme que la planète émet un peu partout, réchauffement, conflit, course à la productivité ? Ou penses-tu au contraire que le musicien doit rester dans sa bulle et ne pas pratiquer le mélange des genres ?
Quelque chose à dire. Et bien, n’importe qui et tout le monde, musicien ou pas a un point de vue sur le sujet. Si tu lis l’histoire, tu peux voir que les choses n’ont pas réellement changé avec nous sauf que maintenant nous avons la technologie et les capacités pour une destruction totale. Les musiciens parlent des temps dans lesquels ils vivent et ces temps sont des temps précaires pour le monde et l’art.

Ø La ou les questions que tu aurais voulu que je te pose, tu peux me les rajouter ici elles seront les bienvenues
Bruno, merci de m’avoir donné la chance de parler à tes lecteurs. J’ai compris de ton site web et de tes livres que tu fais partie de ces artistes talentueux et doués donnant un message clair aux autres avec ta musique et tes textes. Ta façon de partager tes connaissances et ta sagesse avec les autres est admirable. J’attends le jour où nous nous rencontrerons et jouerons. BIG HUG ! Tonyc

www.tonycimorosi.com

Répondre