Ed Friedland

Bassistes, musiciens, luthiers ......
Avatar du membre
Bruno Chaza
Maestro
Maestro
Messages : 2037
Enregistré le : 07 sept. 2004, 21:51
Localisation : France
Contact :

Ed Friedland

Message par Bruno Chaza » 15 mars 2006, 23:40

Voici le dernier entretien avec Ed Fiedland, pour les plus courageux car c'est encore en Anglais, incessamment sous peu, on aura grâce à notre maestria une traduction en français de super facture !!! en attendant enjoy !!


Hello Ed, what were the critical aspects of your musical development (other musicians, specific books, getting to know a standard, a personal revelation, a certain practice method, etc.)?
I started out as a guitar player like a lot of bassists, and I learned most of what I knew from listening to records, and copping licks from friends. When I switched to bass, it was to study classical upright, and it really helped to know the layout of the strings. My background of "jamming" on guitar made it easier for me to transition into jazz because I already had the concept of improvising worked out. Of course, the music was much more difficult.
My musical life as a bassist really began at Berklee, I learned so much there, and when I left and started to gig full time, everything started to make sense to me. So much of what you learn in school is confusing until you've had to put it together on a gig, I feel like my "on the job training" was pretty significant to my development.

Practice methods? Well, I wish I could tell you I am (or at least WAS) a diligent practicer - that I spent 8 hours a day in a methodical, focused manner to get where I am today. Truth is, I've always been a lazy guy, and much of what I have I owe to a strong innate sense of musicality. Sure, I've practiced over the years, but not in the way most people think. I'm very internal in my methods, I think a lot about what I want to know, listen alot, then, when it's time to put it together on the bass, it's just a matter of mechanics. Of course, this works for ME, I don't think anyone should follow my example, they need to find out what type of learner they are and figure out a practice regimen that works for them.

Ø If I want to go out and buy a CD or a method of yours tomorrow, what do you recommend I listen to?
I have yet to put out a CD of my own, and frankly many of the CDs I've played on I don't recommend! I get hired as a sideman to play on all kinds of weird stuff.... Because I don't live in a major city, my "clients" have not been anyone you've heard of, or might even want to hear of! That's the reality of the working bass player. You get a call, you take it, and you do your best regardless of the material.

Methods, now that's another story! I'm very proud of all my books and dvds. It would be hard to recommend one because they are all so different, it really depends on what you're interested in. My first book, "Building Walking Bass Lines" has been translated into French, it's called "Construire des Lignes de Walking Bass". My two newest books "Blues Bass" (Hal Leonard) and "The Way They Play - The R&B Masters" (Backbeat) are very cool. I'm very happy with them.

Ø Are there still musicians that you listen to who give you strength and energy? Could you talk about that?
I have bizarre listen habits. But John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Bill Evans, Neils Henning, Eddie Gomez, Buck Owens, Merle Haggard, Professor Longhair, James Booker, Jimmy Vaughan, Dr. John - these guys always give me a thrill!

I find I don't listen to a lot of bass players, though I'm aware of most of the people out there. I love Victor Wooten, Michael Manring, Otiel, Matt Garrison, all those guys. They are incredible players and all have their unique way of taking the bass to a new place. I've seen them all play many times, and at this point feel like I understand what they are doing and saying with their music. But I don't listen to them in my free time. Maybe it's because I want to diminish their influence on my own direction, but also because I'm a bit burned out on the whole "bass player music" thing. There is so much incredible music out there from the past that I haven't heard yet. I'm more into discovering something old that I've never heard than listening to the newest thing. Plus, I like so many different kinds of music, mostly what you'd call "Americana" (blues, country, r&b, rock) so I very rarely listen to jazz anymore. After all these years, it resides permanently in my head. Push a button, and "A Love Supreme" will play inside my brain, start to finish!

Ø Could you describe a typical week in your life (your interactions with other musicians, your courses, rehearsals, > practice)?
Monday through Wednesdays I stay home and do my work as Senior Editor of Guitar World's Bass Guitar magazine. This involves writing stories on players, product reviews, editing columns, recording audio for product samples, recording written exercises for columns. Thursday and Friday I go to town and teach private students, about 16 a week. Usually Friday I have a gig, and/or Saturday. I'm not gigging as much as I used to, mostly by choice. Right now, I live 75 miles from town in the mountains. It's heaven really, but it makes me less interested in picking up gigs. These days, I mostly play with my band, Big In Vegas, it's a roots Honky Tonk country band. Most people think it's strange that I play country, but honestly, I enjoy it more than anything. As I get older (47) I am less interested in virtuosity and cleverness in music. I like songs that say something, that speak to my heart. The great old country music does that for me, same with blues and roots R&B. I can still play all the fast, intricate jazz stuff, but unless I'm playing with world class players, it's just dull. I don't want to play in a lounge behind some mediocre tenor player that thinks he's Sonny Rollins, or in a restaurant where the main objective is not to disturb the patrons digestion! I've had enough of that. I'll still play jazz concerts when they have an artist coming in from out of town, but the whole local scene is just too uninteresting.

Ø What is your preferred ensemble – the trio or the quartet? Do you think a certain ensemble works best or does it depend on your > mood?
Well, that depends on what kind of music you're talking about. And most importantly, who is playing. I've spent a lot of time doing the jazz piano trio thing, and I love that. Especially if you've got great musicians that understand the Bill Evans concept. That's something I really enjoy doing. A quartet behind an amazing horn player can be lots of fun too. But I don't like playing with people that are too into themselves. As a bass player, I may be more sensitive to it than others. Many times horn players, or soloists play from a very selfish place. "It's all about me" they think. As an accompanist, that gets old real quick. I detest selfish musicians that play as if they were the second coming of Coltrane. No one is so good that I'll want to play behind 5 choruses of their solo. And I've always found the BEST players know instinctively when to shut up.

My preferred ensemble right now is guitar, steel guitar, bass, and drums, your classic country music quartet!

Ø Along the same line, do you have a favorite tempo? What keys do you like to play in?
I'm not a huge fan of playing real fast. It seems in jazz there is a stage when horn players want to practice their up tempo chops. They should get some Jamey Abersold records and leave me out of it! It's a typical show-off thing. It very rarely grooves or feels good to play at 300bpm or more, they just like to do it because it's a chops thing. Chops bore me. Let me hear some MUSIC. Anyway, that said, I do tend to like medium and medium-up tempos. Ballads are fun too if everyone is willing to let it breath. Too often, you play a ballad and the horn player starts in with the double-time thing. It pisses me off, the guy's had ALL NIGHT to play that way, now, let's play some WHOLE NOTES eh?

I'm comfortable in most keys, I'm not drawn to play in Gb, or B, but if I have to, I can.

Ø Do you consider the bass as a rhythm instrument or do you also find appeal in freeform soloing and chord-playing?
I think bass is PRIMARILY a rhythm instrument, and certainly that is the typical use. I've done the solo bass thing, and it's fun... but I'm not pursuing that now. I do use chords a lot in my 6-string jazz approach, and when I play piccolo bass, I play chords at least half the time. I feel that I'm as much of a soloist as any horn player, but I have a much more important job too. No one cares how great you solo if you screw up the form of the tune or drag the tempo. As far as "free form" music goes... I'm not real into that, as I find it is largely shapeless and under developed. There are very few people that create music of value in the "free jazz" realm. Most of it is pretentious posturing, they get by on attitude and "concept". There are of course exceptions, for example Tim Berne and Mike Formanek, and some others. I spent a lot of time early on in my career playing "free jazz" - that was because I didn't know how to play over chord changes! I think more often than not, '"free jazz" is a refuge for scoundrels and fakers.

Ø Where do you think Coltrane’s experiment with two basses in one band could lead music?
Well, have you ever seen Spinal Tap's video of "Big Bottom? ;)

Seriously, it's been so long since Trane did that, and it seems that the two bass format has not really caught on in a big way. I can't say that this has had a major impact on jazz. It only seems to work when the bassists split up the work, one plays bass, the other does something else. Like Renaud Garcia-Fons, brilliant stuff, but he's not playing bass really, he's the soloist who happens tobe playing bass. I play with a bass player when I play piccolo bass, but then, at that point, I'm NOT a bass player - I'm a guitar player. I think it can be done tastefully, but I also detest those obligatory 7 or 10 bass jams they have at the end of every bass event. Maybe I've seen too much of it, in fact - I KNOW I've seen too much of it. I am very jaded and bored with the whole thing, but then, there are always new players that have never experienced it, so I won't tell them to stop doing it!

Ø What advice would you give to young musicians reading this?
Don't let popular opinion effect your vision too much. If you want to play pop music but your jazz buddies think that's lame, screw them! If you want to play jazz, but people tell you there's no money to be made, screw them! If you want to play country but people think you should play more complicated music... you get the picture. Find out what makes you happy, and pursue it.

On a practical level, as a bassist - get functional first. Don't be too concerned with how brilliant you think you are, or want to be. Learn how to keep the form of the tune intact, keep the time and groove happening, construct bass lines that are relevant to the music being played. Listen to all kinds of music, not just the stuff that you like. You can learn something from every type of music.

Ø Do you think there are any solutions to the crisis in the recording industry, the struggle of those who try to make a living as musicians, and the digitalization of music?

Yes, learn what the digital technology can do for you. I've always been interested in music technology, and I've tried to stay current with what's out there. For instance, I've just recorded an album with a singer from another city. The producer emailed me the tracks - minus bass as an MP3. I opened the mp3 in Pro Tools, recorded the bass at home and sent them the track online. I did a whole record and never saw the people (in this case, it was a blessing!)

As far as the recording industry, it's become a bloated, overfed monster that will ultimately fail if it doesn't change with the times. Digital technology has made it possible for artists to create and produce their own music at very high production values. You can make your own record, and sell it online without having a record deal. It's good, and bad, but the tools are available to everyone. The old paradigm of getting signed to a major record label is fading. Think about how many bands put out one record (usually their best) only to make a second record that sucks because some record executive thought he could "make something out of them." Either that, or they don't get to make a second record because they didn't sell 5 million copies.

Ø Do you think the internet can provide a forum for a musical counter-culture or open new possilbities for musicians, or do you think the web will alienate us even more?
Absolutely yes! It's obviously right here in front of us. How did you find me? Online. This would have never happened without the internet. I think the quality of communication is more important than the medium. The problem with the internet is many people don't take the time to consider what they are saying. They just post these little chatty messages back and forth, there's no real communication. I've been online since 1992, and I've developed some strong relationships with people, answered thousands of questions, and learned new things. It's the message, not the medium.

Ø Without getting into a deeply philosophical debate, do you think musicians have something to say about the world’s troubles: global warming, conflicts, economic struggles?
I think all sorts of people have things to say. If a musician feels compelled to express their concerns through their music, they should do that.

I think you've asked some very interesting questions, so I guess that's it! Thanks for being interested in what I have to say, please send me the link when you put it online, I'd love to see it!

http://www.edfriedland.com

madogs
Chef d'orchestre
Chef d'orchestre
Messages : 622
Enregistré le : 27 avr. 2005, 11:30
Localisation : Marmotland
Contact :

Message par madogs » 16 mars 2006, 11:37

simplicité, efficacité et amour de ce que l'on joue peut importe le regard "des autres"... belle leçon, merci !
"le talent c'est d'avoir envie de faire quelque chose, tout le restant, c'est de la sueur." Brel

Avatar du membre
Bruno Chaza
Maestro
Maestro
Messages : 2037
Enregistré le : 07 sept. 2004, 21:51
Localisation : France
Contact :

Ed Friedland

Message par Bruno Chaza » 04 avr. 2006, 23:27

Voici la traduction de l'interview d'Ed Friedland, je remercie Josy pour la qualité de son travail et le temps pris sur sa vie pour réaliser celle-ci vous pouvez visiter le site d'Ed Friedland en cliquant sur le lien ci-dessous.

www.edfriedland.com

Hello Ed,

Ø Quelles ont été les clés de ton évolution, ce qui t’a réellement permis d’avancer, les musiciens, un livre d’étude particulier, la compréhension d’un standard, un déclic personnel,
une façon particulière de travailler etc… ?

J’ai débuté comme guitariste comme un tas de bassistes, et j’ai appris la plupart des choses que je sais en écoutant des disques, et piquant des phrases musicales à des amis. Quand je suis passé à la basse, ce fut pour étudier l’upright classique, et cela m’a vraiment aidé de connaître la disposition des cordes. Mon passé de boeuffeur à la guitare a facilité ma transition vers le jazz parce que le concept d’improvisation était déjà travaillé. Evidemment, la musique était beaucoup plus difficile. Ma vie musicale de bassiste a vraiment commencé à Berklee, j’ai énormément appris là-bas, et quand j’ai quitté et commencé à jouer en public à plein temps, tout a commencé à prendre son sens. Tant de choses apprises à l’école sont source de confusion jusqu’à ce que vous commenciez à les mettre ensemble sur une scène. J’ai la sensation que ma « pratique sur le tas » a été très significative pour mon développement. Des méthodes de pratiques ? Bien, j’aimerais pouvoir te dire que je suis (ou au moins ETAIS) un pratiquant zélé – que je passais 8 heures par jour d’une manière méthodique focalisée pour arriver là où je suis aujourd’hui. La vérité c’est que j’ai toujours été un gars paresseux, et beaucoup de ce que j’ai, je le dois à un fort sens musical inné. Certes, j’ai pratiqué au long des années, mais pas de la façon que croient la plupart des gens. Je suis très intériorisé dans mes méthodes, je pense beaucoup à ce que je veux savoir, écoute énormément, puis quand arrive le moment de tout mettre ensemble sur la basse, c’est juste un procédé mécanique. Bien sûr, cela marche pour MOI, je ne pense pas que quelqu’un d’autre devrait suivre mon exemple, chacun doit découvrir quel type d’étudiant il est et le régime de pratique qui lui convient.

Ø sur quel album aimerais-tu que l’on t’écoute, demain je veux acheter un CD où tu joues, qu’est-ce que tu nous conseilles ?
j’ai maintenant à sortir un CD de mon crû et franchement je ne recommanderai aucun des nombreux disques sur lesquels j’ai joué ! J’ai été recruté comme extra pour jouer toutes sortes de morceaux bizarres … Comme je ne vis pas dans une grande ville, mes « clients » ne sont pas des gens dont tu as entendu parler ou même aimerais écouter ! C’est la réalité du bassiste. On te demande, tu acceptes, et tu fais de ton mieux sans tenir compte du morceau. Les Méthodes, ça c’est une autre histoire ! je suis très fier de tous mes livres et dvd. Ça serait difficile d’en recommander un car ils sont tous si différents, cela dépend vraiment de ce qui t’intéresse. Mon premier livre « Building Walking Bass Lines » a été traduit en français, il s’appelle « Construire des Lignes de Walking Bass ». Mes deux livres les plus récents « Blues Bass » (chez Hal Leonard) et « The Way they Play – The R&B Masters » (chez Backbeat) sont très cool. J’en suis très content.

Ø Est-ce que tu écoutes encore maintenant des musiciens qui te donnent de l’énergie et de la force, peux-tu nous en parler ?

J’ai de curieuses habitudes d’écoute. Mais John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Bill Evans, Neils Henning, Eddie Gomez, Buck Owens, Merle Haggard, Professor Longhair, James Booker, Jimmy Vaughan, Dr. John – ces gars-là me donnent toujours le frisson ! je trouve que je n’écoute pas énormément de bassistes, bien que je connaisse la plupart d’entre eux. J’aime Victor Wooten, Michael Manring, Otiel, Matt Garrison, tous ces mecs. Ce sont d’incroyables instrumentistes et ils ont tous une manière unique d’amener la basse à prendre une nouvelle place. Je les ai tous vus jouer de nombreuses fois, au point que je crois comprendre ce qu’ils font et disent avec leur musique. Mais je ne les écoute pas dans mon temps libre. Peut-être parce que je veux diminuer leur influence sur mon propre jeu, mais aussi parce que je suis un peu blasé sur toute cette affaire de « musique de bassiste ». En dehors, il y a tellement de musique incroyable venant du passé que je n’ai pas encore entendue. Je préfère découvrir quelque chose d’ancien que je n’ai jamais entendu que d’écouter les choses les plus récentes. En plus, j’aime des sortes de musique si différentes, pour la plupart ce que tu appelles « Americana » (blues, country, r&b, rock) alors c’est très rare que j’écoute encore du jazz. Après toutes ces années, il réside en permanence dans ma tête. Pousse un bouton, et « A love supreme » va jouer dans mon cerveau, du début à la fin !

Ø Peux-tu nous décrire une semaine type de ta vie de musicien, cours, séances répétitions, travail personnel ?
Du lundi au mercredi, je reste à la maison et fais mon travail de « Senior Editor » du magazine « Guitare basse du monde de la guitare ». Cela implique écrire des histoires sur les musiciens, des revues de produits, modifier des rubriques, enregistrer de l’audio pour des échantillons de produit, enregistrer des exercices écrits pour les rubriques. Jeudi et vendredi, je vais en ville et enseigne en privé à des étudiants, environ 16 par semaine. D’habitude le vendredi et/ou le samedi j’ai une prestation sur scène. C'est par choix que je ne monte plus sur scène autant que je l’ai fait. Actuellement, j’habite à 120 km de la ville, dans les montagnes. C’est vraiment le paradis, mais ça diminue mon intérêt pour partir donner des spectacles. En ce moment, je joue surtout avec mon Band, Big In Vegas, c’est un band country roots Honky Tonk. La plupart des gens trouvent étrange que je joue du country, mais honnêtement, j’y trouve plus de plaisir que dans n’importe quoi d’autre. Au fur et à mesure que je vieillis (j’ai 47 ans) je suis moins intéressé par la virtuosité et l’intelligence en musique. J’aime les chansons qui disent quelque chose, qui parlent à mon cœur. La bonne vieille musique country fait cela pour moi, de même pour le blues et le roots R&B. Je peux encore jouer toute l’affaire de jazz rapide, complexe, mais à moins de jouer avec des musiciens de classe mondiale, c’est juste ennuyeux. Je ne veux pas jouer dans un salon, derrière un saxo ténor médiocre qui se prend pour Sonny Rollins, ou dans un restaurant où l’objectif principal est de ne pas troubler la digestion des patrons ! J’ai assez connu ça. Je joue encore dans des concerts de jazz quand un artiste extérieur à la ville vient mais toute la scène locale est simplement inintéressante.

Ø Quelles sont les affinités propres à ton jeu, trio, quartet, y a t’il selon toi une formule qui fait passer le mieux ce que tu as à dire ou est-ce suivant l’humeur ?
Et bien, cela dépend de quelle musique tu parles. Et, surtout, qui joue. J’ai beaucoup joué de jazz dans un trio avec piano et j’aime ça. Spécialement si vous êtes avec de grands musiciens qui comprennent le concept Bill Evans. C’est quelque chose que j’aime vraiment. Un quartet derrière un joueur de cuivre fabuleux peut aussi être très jouissif. Mais je n’aime pas jouer avec des gens trop pleins d’eux-mêmes. En tant que bassiste, j’y suis peut-être plus sensible que les autres. Très souvent les cuivres ou les solistes jouent d’une manière très personnelle. Ils pensent « tout ça c’est pour moi ». En tant qu’accompagnateur, cela devient vite un vieux refrain. Je déteste les musiciens qui se prennent pour un second Coltrane. Personne n’est assez bon pour que j’ai envie de jouer après 5 chorus de son solo. Et j’ai toujours trouvé que les MEILLEURS musiciens savent instinctivement quand se taire.

Actuellement mon ensemble préféré est guitare, steel guitar, basse et batterie, ton quartet classique de musique country !

Ø Dans le même style de question as-tu un tempo, ton tempo, lequel ? Quelles sont les tonalités que tu apprécies et dans lesquelles tu navigues en liberté ?
Je ne suis pas un grand fan de jeu rapide. On dirait que dans le jazz il y a une étape où les cuivres veulent pratiquer leur dextérité, leur technique sur des tempos ultra rapides. Ils devraient acquérir quelques disques de Jamey Abersold et me laisser en dehors de ça ! C’est typiquement pour s’exhiber ! Il est très rare que ça groove ou que l’on se sente bien à 300 bpm ou plus, ils aiment juste le faire parce que c’est technique. Ces histoires de dextérité m’ennuient. Laisse moi entendre de la MUSIQUE. Enfin, ceci dit, j’ai tendance à préférer les tempo medium et medium-haut. Les ballades sont agréables aussi si tout le monde veut les laisser respirer. Trop souvent, vous jouez une ballade et le joueur de cuivre démarre double tempo. Ça me coupe toute envie, le gars a TOUTE LA NUIT pour jouer comme ça, maintenant, jouons quelques NOTES ENTIERES eh ? Je me sens à l’aise dans la plupart des clés, je ne suis pas attiré par Gb ou B même si je peux le faire, si nécessaire.

Ø Considères-tu la basse comme l’instrument du groove, ou es-tu de ceux qui aiment aussi la liberté en solo et en accords ?

Je pense que la basse est D’ABORD un instrument rythmique et c’est certainement son utilisation typique. J’ai fait du solo de basse, et c’est agréable … mais je ne continue pas. J’utilise beaucoup d’accords dans mon approche jazz à 6 cordes, et quand je joue de la basse piccolo, je joue des accords au moins la moitié du temps. Je pense que je suis autant un soliste que n’importe quel joueur de cuivre, mais j’ai aussi un travail plus important. Personne ne s’intéresse à la qualité de votre solo si vous bousillez la forme du ton ou décalez le tempo. En ce qui concerne la musique « freeform », je ne m’y intéresse pas vraiment, car je trouve que ça manque largement de consistance et est sous-développé. Il y a très peu de gens qui créent de la musique valable dans le monde du « free jazz ». Pour la plupart il s’agit de postures prétentieuses, ils s’essayent sur des attitudes et des « concepts ». Bien sûr, il y a des exceptions, par exemple Tim Berne et Mike Formanek, et quelques autres. J’ai passé pas mal de temps plus tôt dans ma carrière à jouer du « free jazz » - c’était parce que je ne savais pas comment jouer sur des changements d’accords ! Je pense plus souvent que jamais que le « free jazz » est un refuge pour les esbroufeurs et les faussaires.

Ø Deux basses dans un orchestre comme Coltrane l’a expérimenté, tu penses que ça peut orienter la musique vers quelle direction ?
Et bien as-tu vu la video « Big Bottom » de Spinal Tap ?
Sérieusement, il y a si longtemps que Trane a fait ça et il semble que le format deux basses n’a pas vraiment pris de manière importante. Je ne peux pas dire que ça a eu un impact majeur sur le jazz. Cela semble uniquement marcher quand les deux bassistes divisent le travail, un joue de la basse, l’autre fait autre chose. Comme le brillant travail de Renaud Garcia-Fons, mais il ne joue pas vraiment de la basse, il est le soliste qui se trouve jouer de la basse. Je joue avec un bassiste quand je joue de la basse piccolo, mais alors, à ce moment, je ne suis PAS un bassiste – je suis un guitariste. Je pense que ça peut être fait avec goût, mais je déteste aussi ces jams obligatoires à 7 ou 10 basses organisées à la fin de chaque rencontre de basses. Peut-être que j’en ai trop vues, en fait – je SAIS que j’en ai trop vues. Je suis complètement rassasié, fatigué de tout ça, mais en même temps, il y a toujours de nouveaux musiciens qui n’ont jamais connu ça, alors je ne leur demanderai pas d’arrêter de le faire !

Ø Quels sont les conseils que tu donnerais aux aspirants musiciens qui te lisent ?
Ne pas trop laisser l’opinion populaire affecter votre vision. Si vous voulez jouer de la Pop music mais que vos relations de jazz pensent que c’est mauvais, clouez leur le bec ! Si vous voulez jouer du jazz mais que les gens vous disent qu’on ne peut pas gagner d’argent, clouez leur le bec ! si vous voulez jouer du country mais que les gens pensent que vous devriez jouer de la musique plus compliquée … vous avez saisi l’idée. Découvrez ce qui vous rend heureux et poursuivez ce chemin. Au niveau pratique, en tant que bassiste – soyez d’abord fonctionnel. Ne vous laissez pas trop emporter par l’idée de votre brio actuel ou futur. Apprenez à conserver intacte la forme de la tonalité, construisez des lignes de basses cohérentes avec la musique en train d’être jouée. Ecoutez toutes sortes de musique, pas simplement ce que vous aimez. Vous pouvez apprendre quelque chose de tous les types de musique.

Ø La crise du disque, l’individualisme forcené de ceux qui arrivent à vivre de la musique, le formatage des musiques, est-ce que tu penses que la pente est irréversible ou est-ce que tu entrevois des solutions ?
Oui, apprends ce que la technologie numérique peut faire pour toi. J’ai toujours été intéressé par la technologie musicale et j’ai essayé de rester au niveau avec ce qui s’y passe. Par exemple, je viens juste d’enregistrer un album avec un chanteur d’une autre ville. Le producteur m’a envoyé les pistes - moins la basse en mp3 par email. J’ai ouvert le mp3 avec les Pro Tools, enregistré la basse à la maison et leur ai envoyé la piste en ligne. J’ai fait un enregistrement complet et n’ai jamais vu les gens (dans ce cas précis, ce fut une bénédiction !)Pour ce qui concerne l’industrie du disque, c’est devenu un monstre bouffi et gavé qui va finir par échouer s’il ne change pas avec les temps. La technologie numérique rend possible pour les artistes de créer et produire leur propre musique avec des valeurs de production très hautes. Vous pouvez faire votre propre disque et le vendre en ligne sans avoir un contrat d’enregistrement Ça du bon et du mauvais, mais les outils sont disponibles pour tous.
Le vieux paradigme de signer dans une grande compagnie de disques est en train de s’évanouir. Pense à tous les ensembles qui ont produit un disque (généralement leur meilleur) pour faire uniquement un second disque qui rapporte parce que quelque cadre de la maison pensait « pouvoir faire quelque chose d’eux ». Soit ça, ou alors ils n’ont pas fait de second disque parce qu’ils n’avaient pas vendu 5 millions d’exemplaires.

Ø Dans le même genre de question penses-tu qu’Internet puisse être un facteur déclenchant un contre-pouvoir une contre-culture, bref une ouverture de plus pour le musicien ou crois tu à l’inverse que la toile va nous isoler encore plus ?
Oui absolument ! C’est de toute évidence juste là en face de nous. Comment m’as-tu trouvé ? En ligne. Ceci ne serait jamais arrivé sans internet. Je pense que la qualité de la communication est plus importante que le media. Le problème avec Internet c’est que beaucoup de gens ne prennent pas le temps de réfléchir à ce qu’ils disent. Il se contentent d’échanger ces petits messages de chat, il n’y a pas de communication réelle. Je suis en ligne depuis 1992, et j’ai développé quelques relations fortes avec des gens, répondu à des milliers de questions et appris de nouvelles choses. C’est le message, pas le media.

Ø Sans rentrer dans un haut débat philosophique, penses-tu que le musicien a son mot à dire face aux cris d’alarme que la planète émet un peu partout, réchauffement, conflit, course à la productivité ? Ou penses-tu au contraire que le musicien doit rester dans sa bulle et ne pas pratiquer le mélange des genres ?
Je pense que toutes sortes de personnes ont des choses à dire. Si un musicien se sent poussé à exprimer ses inquiétudes à travers sa musique, il doit le faire.

Ø La ou les questions que tu aurais voulue(s) que je te pose, tu peux me les rajouter ici elles seront les bienvenues
Je pense que tu as posé quelques questions très intéressantes, alors je suppose que ça y est ! Merci de t’intéresser à ce que j’ai à dire, merci de m’envoyer le lien quand tu le mettras en ligne, ça me fera très plaisir de le consulter ! :wink:
Modifié en dernier par Bruno Chaza le 20 avr. 2006, 21:44, modifié 5 fois.

fanto
Chef d'orchestre
Chef d'orchestre
Messages : 701
Enregistré le : 14 mars 2005, 15:16
Localisation : Isère/Savoie

Message par fanto » 05 avr. 2006, 01:00

Oupss, pardon, c'est ici :lol:
La meilleure spontanéité est celle qui est mûrement réfléchie...

khan
Moderato
Messages : 1328
Enregistré le : 23 mai 2005, 17:35
Localisation : caen
Contact :

Message par khan » 05 avr. 2006, 01:37

Super instructif et pas rassurant sur le vecu en fin de carriere ,mais il reste philosophe malgré tout ,j'aime bien"Je ne veux pas jouer dans un salon, derrière un saxo ténor médiocre qui se prend pour Sonny Rollins, ou dans un restaurant où l’objectif principal est de ne pas troubler la digestion des patrons ! J’ai assez connu ça. Je joue encore dans des concerts de jazz quand un artiste extérieur à la ville vient mais toute la scène locale est simplement inintéressante. "

Aie :roll: Comme quoi meme aux states

Avatar du membre
xumun
Moderato
Messages : 1137
Enregistré le : 26 avr. 2005, 12:43
Localisation : marseille

Message par xumun » 05 avr. 2006, 19:12

interview très sympa 8)
Image
Spector euro LX 4c
Spector Rebop Fretless 4c
Markbass Micromark

Avatar du membre
binuche
Chef d'orchestre
Chef d'orchestre
Messages : 721
Enregistré le : 14 mars 2005, 21:30
Localisation : loire atlantique : donc Nantes

Message par binuche » 05 avr. 2006, 22:57

AAHHH, ça fait du bien :P
@+

Avatar du membre
Bruno Chaza
Maestro
Maestro
Messages : 2037
Enregistré le : 07 sept. 2004, 21:51
Localisation : France
Contact :

Ed friedland Photo

Message par Bruno Chaza » 07 avr. 2006, 16:49

Une ch'tite photo sympa pour agrémenter l'entretien
Dernière chose, Ed Friedland se déplace géographiquement il va vivre desormais à Austin Texas, voila pour la dernière info du jour !
Image

Avatar du membre
aftalnoran
Nouveau bassiste-forumeur
Nouveau bassiste-forumeur
Messages : 24
Enregistré le : 30 avr. 2006, 00:38
Localisation : Paris
Contact :

Message par aftalnoran » 30 avr. 2006, 00:52

Bien cool comme interview... Enfin un gars qui balance tout haut ce que tout le monde pense tout bas! Marre de la virtuosité à la con. Vive la basse qui fait boum!
http://web.mac.com/emmanuel.bris
Blog des Petits Cons.

http://killthedonk.spreadshirt.net
Site de ma marque de sapes de Poker.

khan
Moderato
Messages : 1328
Enregistré le : 23 mai 2005, 17:35
Localisation : caen
Contact :

Message par khan » 30 avr. 2006, 14:41

A propos d'interwiew ,tu as pas des nouvelles de ta master avec garrison ?

Avatar du membre
aftalnoran
Nouveau bassiste-forumeur
Nouveau bassiste-forumeur
Messages : 24
Enregistré le : 30 avr. 2006, 00:38
Localisation : Paris
Contact :

Message par aftalnoran » 30 avr. 2006, 15:16

Hey Khan!
déjà, bien bien d'avoir cessé la clope, tu me fais penser (en plus jeune) à mon père, qui a étrangement cessé du jour au lendemain lorsque son toubib a regardé ses résultats...

Pour Matt Garrison, c'est simple, il attend d'avoir une tournée sur France, et me préviens que je puisse organiser la master, et déjà voir s'il y a du monde. En effet faut pouvoir le payer, même s'il ne demande pas énormément. Quoiqu'il arrive, je préviendrai tout le monde assez longtemps à l'avance pour que tout le monde puisse se débrouiller pour en être!
En fait le truc c'est qu'il est passé rapidement fin février ou janvier je sais plus trop, mais à Nice... l'idéal est de le choper lorsqu'il est sur Paris, pour ne pas le faire se déplacer et engendrer des frais supplémentaires.

Il passe avec Herbie Hancock fin juillet à Marciac... ça va payer!
http://web.mac.com/emmanuel.bris
Blog des Petits Cons.

http://killthedonk.spreadshirt.net
Site de ma marque de sapes de Poker.

Go
Forumeur bassiste
Forumeur bassiste
Messages : 70
Enregistré le : 03 févr. 2006, 19:32
Localisation : ParisNorth 92(Asnieres Sur Seine) - Italia(Pescara)

Message par Go » 30 avr. 2006, 16:06

oaui bah tiens au jus afta,moi je serait partant pour une ptite master avec le Garrison :D
Modifié en dernier par Go le 30 avr. 2006, 20:08, modifié 1 fois.

Avatar du membre
xumun
Moderato
Messages : 1137
Enregistré le : 26 avr. 2005, 12:43
Localisation : marseille

Message par xumun » 30 avr. 2006, 20:04

si c pas trop indiscret afta tu le connais personnellement garrison :shock:
Image
Spector euro LX 4c
Spector Rebop Fretless 4c
Markbass Micromark

Avatar du membre
aftalnoran
Nouveau bassiste-forumeur
Nouveau bassiste-forumeur
Messages : 24
Enregistré le : 30 avr. 2006, 00:38
Localisation : Paris
Contact :

Message par aftalnoran » 01 mai 2006, 02:37

oui, disons un pote de basse, voilà tout. Sauf qu'il est un peu plus connu que les autres, et forcément ça le fait plus, héhé;
http://web.mac.com/emmanuel.bris
Blog des Petits Cons.

http://killthedonk.spreadshirt.net
Site de ma marque de sapes de Poker.

Avatar du membre
xumun
Moderato
Messages : 1137
Enregistré le : 26 avr. 2005, 12:43
Localisation : marseille

Message par xumun » 01 mai 2006, 09:47

là, Afta ta réponse modeste honore ta signature :D
Image
Spector euro LX 4c
Spector Rebop Fretless 4c
Markbass Micromark

Répondre